I saw this at Oakland & Fraternal Historic Cemetery Park (Little Rock) yesterday.

I think it's safe to assume since Walter died at age 18, he was not a sailor.
 photo anchor holga.jpg

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So looking to find the symbolism of the anchor, I ran across this:
"The anchor is a symbol of hope. The reason for this symbolic meaning comes from the passage in the Epistle to the Hebrews 6: "19 Which hope we have as an anchor of the soul, both sure and steadfast, and which entereth into that within the veil...'" Source: Stories in Stone, at page 111.
They are memorials to those who pass before us - some breathtakingly ornate, carved by master stone masons. Some are heartbreakingly simple, carved by loving hands of a father who could not pay for his baby's gravestone.

Though the histories carved on their surfaces may be brief, with only a name and a date, others are much more elaborate, including room sized structures erected to honor the dead.

They are there because someone wanted to remember.

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This blog features photography of and posts about cemeteries and the memorial art contained in them, including funerary symbolism as it has progressed throughout the years. Please feel free to add your own photos in your comments.

The majority of the photos were taken in cemeteries and family graveyards in Arkansas, where I can often be found wandering with camera in hand...

© Dee Burris Blakley, 2011-2016. All rights reserved. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Dee Burris Blakley with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.
Before I was the unofficial family historian, I took photos of gravestones.

Cemeteries have never been scary places for me - quite the opposite. I am very comfortable in cemeteries.

I love cemetery art. That's why I can hardly bear to pass up a cemetery when I travel across my state, cameras riding safely in the backseat.

The older the cemetery is, the more I'm drawn to it. The older ones have gravestones full of symbolism.

If you are as fond of funerary art as I am, then Stories in Stone: A Field Guide to Cemetery Symbolism and Iconography, by Douglas Keister, is a worthwhile investment. It even has a coated cover so you can take it graving on foggy and misty days...

Disclosure: I took all of the gravestone photos that appear in this entry, with the exception of the ones from Colonial Park Cemetery in Savannah, GA. Those photos were taken by a co-worker and her husband who know what a fool for cemeteries I am, and were given to me with their permission to post.


Angels
Some of the most beautiful depictions of angels I've ever seen are in cemeteries.

Angels get special treatment in Stories in Stone, including a very interesting history of angels.

To date, my all-time favorite angel is this one.

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Oakland Cemetery, Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR


The back is just as detailed as the front.

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Calvary Cemetery, Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR

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Mount Holly Cemetery, Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR


This one is interesting to me, because it combines a number of symbols.
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Mount Holly Cemetery, Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR

In addition to the angel, there's a cross, a wreath, a scroll and a crown. The crown is symbolic of triumph over death, the scroll symbolizes written scripture, and the wreath means victory over death.

Children's Graves
Children's graves, even more recent ones, are frequently adorned with lambs.

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Carter Cemetery, Russell, White Co., AR

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Shiloh Cemetery, Pope Co., AR


Couples' Symbols
Probably everyone has seen the modern day indicator of the married couple - a double gravestone, sometimes with entwined rings on it, as well as the date of the marriage.

I think one of my favorite "couple" symbols is the one of clasped hands - one with a masculine cuff on the sleeve, and one with a frillier cuff. It was a very popular symbol in the 19th century.

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Ford Cemetery, Pope Co., AR

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Shiloh Cemetery, Pope Co., AR


The arch symbolizes the passage to heaven for both of them, and joins their stones.

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Elmwood Cemetery, Memphis, Shelby Co., TN


Fraternal Organizations
I had no idea my g-g-grandfather, James Littleton Burris, was a Freemason until I studied his gravestone. I'm still trying to figure out g-g-grandma's (Elizabeth Adeline (Ashmore) Burris) gravestone symbology, because the star for the Order of the Eastern Star (the women's auxiliary of the Freemasons) should be a five point star with the tip pointing down.


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St Joe Cemetery, Pope Co., AR


Woodmen of the World gravestones are all over Arkansas, although I see fewer Women of Woodcraft stones (below the WoW stone).

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Calvary Cemetery, Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR

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Edgewood Cemetery, North Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR


This one combines a drape with the Masonic symbol...
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Atkins City Cemetery, Atkins, Pope Co., AR


Odd Fellows - Friendship, Love, and Truth...
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Elmwood Cemetery, Memphis, Shelby Co., TN


The Mosaic Templars...

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Robinson Cemetery, Faulkner Co., AR


Religious Symbols
Crosses come in all shapes, sizes, and not all have the same meaning.

A Maltese cross. (It took me quite a while to figure this one out.)

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Pleasant Hill Cemetery, Pulaski Co., AR


A German-Russian cross with a sunburst in a Catholic cemetery...

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St. Peter and St. Paul Cemetery, Logan Co., AR


i h s is derived from the first three letters in Jesus' name using the Greek alphabet: Iota, Eta, Sigma. (A variation sometimes seen is IHC, using the Roman alphabet.)

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Calvary Cemetery, Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR

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Edgewood Cemetery, North Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR


The hand pointing up to heaven (look at the bottom of the stone)...
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Tate Cemetery, Pope Co., AR


I love the detail in the angel at the bottom of this flore' (floriated) cross:
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St. Peter and St. Paul Cemetery, Logan Co., AR


Mortality Symbols
From my pal at the office, a wonderful example of one of the earliest versions of the death head that was used in the United States, beginning in 1752:

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Colonial Park Cemetery, Savannah, Chatham Co., GA
Photo courtesy of Larry and Darla Freeman


The hourglass...
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Colonial Park Cemetery, Savannah, Chatham Co., GA
Photo courtesy of Larry and Darla Freeman


Inverted torches...
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Mount Holly Cemetery, Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR


Drapes - on obelisks and urns...
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Mount Holly Cemetery, Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR

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Oakland Cemetery, Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR


A tree, cut short...
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Elmwood Cemetery, Memphis, Shelby Co., TN


Other Symbols

The mourner, often shown as a weeping woman.

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Elmwood Cemetery, Memphis, Shelby Co., TN

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Calvary Cemetery, Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR


The weeping willow, a mourning symbol...
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Colonial Park Cemetery, Savannah, Chatham Co., GA
Photo courtesy of Larry and Darla Freeman


The dove, universally known as a symbol of peace.
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Alpine Cemetery, Clark Co., AR


Stones placed on top of a gravestone come from the history of many cultures, including Native American tribes and nomadic Jews, who tended graves marked with mounds of stones in their travels.

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Oakland Cemetery, Little Rock, Pulaski Co., AR
In the summer of 2009, I went downtown to photograph some Civil War graves and monuments at the Little Rock National Cemetery for a possible volunteer project with the National Parks Service.

And Oakland is just next door...it's one of my favorites. One of my great-great grandmothers is buried there - something I did not learn until I had already been there multiple times and taken hundreds of images.

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Funerary symbols abound in old cemeteries.

I love the draped urn...a life snuffed out.

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Just sleeping...I think this one also qualifies as a hip tomb. (Note the resemblance to a hipped roof in the middle under the cover.)

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Not sure exactly what the symbolism is here...that the earth will cover the mortal remains, perhaps?

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Lots of obelisks...

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The child's stone is the tallest one in that family plot...

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Sarcophagi and mausoleums...

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And stones on the stone...a practice that is literally thousands of years old, and began in times when nomadic Jews stopped in their journeys to repair graves, heaping more stones and pebbles on top of shallow graves dug in rocky soils to prevent disturbance of the grave by animals.

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The practice of placing stones or pebbles on a grave has meaning in other cultures also, with stones representing the immortality of the soul

April 2016

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